Career Success Is More Dependent On EQ THAN IQ: SO WHAT?

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by 
CharterQuest
, 21 July 2017

Subtitle

We generally use superlatives like A or Higher Grade, Cum Laude or Distinction, to signify exceptional student performance, and generally, the intelligence of students. Exceptional students scoring these superlatives, tend to get the first right of admission to the next or higher level course, secure the limited scholarships available, and -should they continue to perform at this level -are often deemed to have the brightest future career. Then, overtime, you look at the world of politics, religion, business, accounting, military, law and countless others -perhaps with the exception of fields like research and engineering where work is far more rational than interpersonally interactive, you find that the most accomplished and successful were not necessarily the most exceptional students at school. What explains this potentially poor fit between intelligence at school and long-term career success?

LET’S CATEGORISE TWO TYPES OF INTELLIGENCE– COGNITIVE INTELLIGENCE (IQ), AND EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE (EQ)

Until at least 1995 when it first became popularised by Dr. Goleman, in his bestselling book, ‘Emotional Intelligence –Why It Can Matter More than IQ’, we had been conditioned to believe Cognitive Intelligence -measured as Intelligence Quotient (IQ) -is the best measure of human potential. Cognitive Intelligence is what exams at school are all about – 

they are nothing short of IQ tests in each module –designed to assess your general mental capability that, among other things, involves the ability to reason, plan, solve problems, think logically and abstractly; ability to perceive relationships between things, comprehend complex ideas, learn quickly; ability to store and retrieve information. Unless applied rigorously -say in an integrated case study -to assess a broader and deeper capability for comprehending our surroundings "catching on”, “making sense” of things, or “figuring out” what to do, IQ tests are merely book learning -a narrow academic skill!

Daniel Goleman argued that Emotional Intelligence –typically measured as EQ –on the other hand, is the ability to monitor one’s own, and others’ feelings and emotions, to discriminate among them, and to use this information to guide one’s thinking and actions. The Goleman Model focuses on EI as a wide array of competencies and skills that drive leadership performance, namely: 

Self-awareness: This is self-confidence, and the ability to read your own emotions and recognise their impact while using gut feeling to guide decisions. 

Self (Regulation) Management: This is self-discipline, including controlling your emotions and impulses, and adapting to changing circumstances.

Motivation (Personal drive): The desire, effort, drive or the passion you display for any endeavour you undertake.

Empathy: The ability to sense, understand, and react to others’ emotions, showing unconditional caring for yourself, but mainly for others. 

Social (Skills) or Relationship Management: Comprehending social networks -congruency and un-conditioning of the mind in relationships, valuing honesty and ethics; and the ability to inspire, influence, and interact interpersonally whilst managing conflict. 

WHY IS YOUR CAREER SUCCESS MORE DEPENDENT ON YOUR EQ THAN YOUR IQ?

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CharterQuest